05:55
24 juli 2021

Ripple effect: The social consequences of the ‘everyday’ hate crime

Ripple effect: The social consequences of the ‘everyday’ hate crime

Hate crime can have a long-lasting and devastating effect on victims, but what about the impact on the wider community? New research by Monash University’s Researcher Chloe Keel, Prof Rebecca Wickes and lecturer Kathryn Benier found that ‘secondary exposure’ to hate crime could actually increase negative sentiments towards migrant groups and lead to more boundaries between sections of the community.

Hate crimes towards specific ethnic, racial or religious groups are increasing in Australia. These kinds of crimes are defined here as “unlawful, violent, destructive or threatening conduct in which the perpetrator is motivated by prejudice towards the victim’s social group”. They tend to occur more often near the home of the victim.

Lees verder via policinginsight.com

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